The Muv-X features 4 High Output UV-C, also called Germicidal UV (GUV) lamps for total room irradiation. The Muv-X units are designed for virtually any room that needs air and surface disinfection, including sterile areas, laboratories, unoccupied patient rooms etc. Each unit is equipped with casters for maximum portability, a 750cm power cord, on/off switch with 2min delay, timer and carry handle. The unit physical size is 500mm x 500mm x 540mm and the units weight is 12kgs. The Muv-X is also constructed to allow units to be stacked on top of one another to increase efficiency and speed of disinfecting a room

 

After your usual deep clean happens, the Portable UV-C Room Sterilizer is brought into the room/area to be
sterilized, the timer is set according to the size of the room and plugged into a standard socket. The person
operating the unit leaves the room which remains empty during the period of use and the unit automatically
switches on 2 mins later.
No special training is required, and units can be stacked to save time and ensure more areas are covered by
the Ultraviolet light (UV-C).

Basic FAQs

What is germicidal UV, and what is UVGI?

Germicidal UV (GUV) refers to using ultraviolet radiant energy to inactivate bacteria, mold spores, fungi or viruses. When the process is applied in a given location, it has generally been referred to as ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UVGI).

Is all ultraviolet considered germicidal ultraviolet (GUV)?

No. Germicidal ultraviolet (GUV) – refers to short-wavelength ultraviolet “light” (radiant energy) that has been shown to kill bacteria and spores and to inactivate viruses. Wavelengths in the photo-biological ultraviolet spectral band known as the “UV-C,” from 200 to 280 nanometers (nm), have been shown to be the most effective for disinfection. UV-C wavelengths comprise photons (particles of light) that are the most energetic in the optical spectrum (comprising UV, visible, and infrared) and therefore are the most photo-chemically active.

Can UV-C kill viruses as well as bacteria?

Yes, UV-C kills living bacteria, but viruses are technically not living organisms; thus, we should correctly say “inactivate viruses.” Individual, energetic UV-C photons photo-chemically interact with the RNA and DNA molecules in a virus or bacterium to render these microbes non-infectious. This all happens on the microscopic level. Viruses are less than one micrometer (µm, one-millionth of a meter) in size, and bacteria are typically 0.5 to 5 µm.

Can UV-C effectively inactivate the SARS-CoV-2 virus, responsible for COVID-19?

Yes, if the virus is directly illuminated by UV-C at the effective dose level. UV-C can play an effective role with other methods of disinfection, but it is essential that individuals be protected to prevent UV hazards to the eyes and skin as elaborated in Section 4. UV-C should not be used to disinfect the hands!

Can near-ultraviolet (UV-A) lamps, such as UV insect traps, be used for GUV?

No. UV-A and longer (visible) wavelengths do not have germicidally effective emission wavelengths to inactivate viruses. Their relative disinfection capability is very minimal on the order of 1,000 times less effective in terms of fluence rate than the low-pressure mercury germicidal lamp. There have been only very special applications of wavelengths in the UV-A and violet (e.g., 405 nm), which require very high doses not practical in an occupied environment and were not recommended for viral sterilization. The trace amount of UV-B that is emitted from some white-light fluorescent lamps probably has similar efficacy.

Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have been available for some time in the UV-A region. The advantage of UV-A or visible-light LEDs would be that they can easily be incorporated into LED-based luminaires, and there might be no need for protective gear. However, the efficacy of violet or UV-A energy that is not harmful to the skin or eyes is minimal.

Does the ultraviolet in sunlight have a GUV effect?

Yes, particularly in the late spring and early summer when the sun is high in the sky and the UV index is high. At a UV Index of 10, the duration to achieve at least a three-log kill of bacteria (99.9% killed) is estimated as less than one hour.

Medical & Healthcare

General

The official position of the World Health Organization (WHO) is that this virus is spread by contact with large respiratory droplets, directly or indirectly by touching contaminated surfaces and then touching the eyes, nose, or mouth. However, research is underway to determine the degree of airborne spread—meaning virus in particles so small that they remain suspended in air. Such aerosol results from the evaporation of larger respiratory particles generated by coughs, sneezes, ordinary speech, singing, and possibly by faulty plumbing systems, as occurred with the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) virus. How much of the virus responsible for COVID-19 is spread by the airborne route is not clear, but recommendations for healthcare workers to use fitted respirators, not surgical masks, reveal official concern for airborne transmission. The possibility that inhaled virus may result in more-severe lung damage than acquisition by other routes—for example, via the mouth, nose, or eye—is currently being investigated.

How long do virus particles and bacteria remain airborne

This is important, but difficult to answer in a simple fashion and it depends on how the microbes were made airborne, e.g., from a sneeze or cough, or by being blown up from surfaces or dusted off clothes. The smallest particles (1- to 5-µm droplet nuclei) can remain airborne much longer than cough droplets—for many minutes or even hours.

How can airborne spread viruses be reduced?

Diagnosis of infectious cases and their isolation is a critical intervention, but transmission from asymptomatic persons is believed to play an important role in community transmission. In the U.S., the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has recommended that everyone wear non-medical face covers to reduce spread by respiratory droplets, both large and small. Healthcare workers should wear well fitted respirators designed to exclude airborne particles, in addition to following all contact precautions. For the airborne component, ventilation, social distancing, and other means of air disinfection are expected to have a role. Natural ventilation outdoors and in homes can be highly effective where conditions are optimal in terms of airflow and temperature. Mechanical ventilation can be effective, but 6 to 12 air changes per hour (ACH) are recommended in general for air disinfection or dilution.

How does GUV work to disinfect air?

Commonly used GUV lamps generate predominantly 254-nm UV radiant energy, which is close to the peak germicidal wavelengths of 265 to 270 nm – both in the UV-C range, compared to the longer wavelength ultraviolet (UV-A and UV-B) in sunlight. GUV radiant energy damages nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) by causing mutations that prevent replication, thus leading to the death of virtually all bacteria and inactivation of all viruses–both DNA and RNA types. Bacteria and viruses vary somewhat in UV susceptibility, with environmental organisms, fungal spores, and mycobacteria being relatively harder to kill than more rapidly replicating and non-environmental microbes and most bacteria. But even fungi are effectively killed with high-dose UV, which is used, for example, to treat fungal contamination of air.

Has GUV been useful in medical treatment facilities?

Yes. Some hospitals have used portable GUV fixtures as mentioned in the introduction to disinfect air and surfaces in unoccupied rooms as a supplemental control measure to reduce the spread of healthcare associated infections.

Medical treatment facilities are using GUV in three primary ways: 1) upper-room GUV fixtures with air mixing, for controlling airborne pathogens in an occupied space; 2) mobile GUV units, to disinfect high-touch surfaces; and 3) GUV in HVAC air handling units, to treat recirculated air and to reduce mould growth on cooling coils. Mobile GUV units were used in the People’s Republic of China in response to COVID-19.

How do research scientists determine efficacy for killing or deactivation of different microorganisms and viruses?

The most fundamental concept in photobiology is the action spectrum (or relative response) for a given effect. This action spectrum extends from 235 nm to 313 nm and peaks at approximately 265 nm. A wavelength of 254 nm has a relative efficacy of 0.85; by contrast, 313 nm in the UV-B has a relative efficacy of only 0.01.

 

How useful are UV-C rays in disinfecting surfaces? PPE? Are UV-C Wands effective?

General

UVGI (UV-C in the appropriate range) is an excellent surface disinfectant. The International Ultraviolet Association (IUVA) believes that UV disinfection technologies can play a role in a multiple barrier approach to reducing the transmission of the virus causing COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2, based on current disinfection data and empirical evidence. UV-C helps to mitigate the risk of acquiring an infection in contact with the COVID-19 virus when applied correctly. This product will address the need to sterilise rooms.
UV-C light has been used extensively for more than 40 years in disinfecting surfaces against a whole suite of human pathogens (Fluence UV Dose Required review IUVA: https://www.iuvanews.com/stories/pdf/archives/180301_UVSensitivityReview_full.pdf ). All bacteria and viruses tested to date (many hundreds over the years, including other coronaviruses) respond to UV disinfection. Some organisms are more susceptible to UV-C disinfection than others, but all tested so far do respond at the appropriate doses.
COVID-19 infections can be caused by contact with contaminated surfaces and then touching facial areas (less common than person-to-person, but still an issue). Minimizing this risk is key because COVID-19 virus can live on plastic and steel surfaces for many hours. Normal cleaning and disinfection may leave behind some residual contamination, which UVC can treat suggesting that a multiple disinfectant approach is prudent. Accepting that where the UV-C light cannot reach a particular pathogen, that pathogen will not be disinfected. However in general, reducing the total number of pathogens reduces the risk of transmission. The total pathogenic load can be reduced substantially by applying UV to the many surfaces that are readily exposed, as a secondary barrier to cleaning. Many published studies conclude that UVGI lamps is effective on the spread of infectious respiratory diseases e.g. https://www.ajicjournal.org/article/S0196-6553(15)00757-9/fulltext .

Can GUV be used to disinfect surgical masks and the N95 respirator mask?

Hydrogen peroxide (H202)-vapor disinfection has been the most recommended method now in use.However, if this is not available, studies by several laboratories have shown surprisingly effective UV disinfection despite the fact that UV photons will not have a straight-line pass through all the porous filter structure. Therefore, forward-scattered photons have to penetrate the mask, and substantial doses are required. This should only be attempted within a light-tight enclosure. In the U.S., NIOSH and the FDA have issued temporary guidance on this important subject.

Are GUV wands effective for disinfecting surfaces?

Hand-held, compact GUV products (see Figure 4-1) have been marketed for more than a decade for disinfecting small objects such as cell phones. Most of these emit less than 2 mW/cm2 of 254-nm UV-C at contact (ours is > 12W/cm2 per bulb), meaning that the wand has to be held to the surface for several seconds for an effective multi-log unit disinfection. Waving it over an object such as a postcard for one second will not provide reliable disinfection. These products typically employ a safety switch that senses when the emission is not directed downward (away from the eyes) and shuts off if turned upward. Even if safely used, these might provide a false impression of effective disinfection.

GUV Safety

GUV Safety

UVGI lamp emissions can pose a workplace safety and health hazard to the eyes and skin if the lamps are improperly used or installed. However, these lamps can be used safely if workers are informed regarding the hazards and follow appropriate precautions. A great deal is known about the human exposure limits of 254-nm UV (UV-C) irradiation. Compared to the UV-A and UV-B in sunlight, UV-C is almost entirely absorbed by the outer dead layer (stratum corneum) and outer skin (outer epidermis), with very limited penetration to the deeper cellular layers of skin where new cells are constantly created. For comparison, the current daily safety limit of 254-nm UV-C for 8 hours is 6.0 mJ/cm2 whereas less than ten minutes of summer sun exposure at a UV Index of 10 can deliver the equivalent limiting daily safety because of its much more-penetrating UV-A and UV-B.
As it has no outer dead protective layer, the human eye is the organ most susceptible to sunlight and GUV. Exceeding the threshold level value (TLV) will result in painful irritation of the cornea similar to over-exposure on a sunny day, especially from sun reflected from water or snow. The damage is painful but transitory, with corneal shedding and replacement in a day or two.
There are no known long-term consequences from an accidental UV-C overexposure. Most eye injuries result from workers cleaning fixtures or working in the room without first turning off the fixtures.

Are there safety rules for GUV surface-disinfection lamps?

To ensure the safe use of UVGI lamps for surface disinfection, follow these guidelines:
• Cleaning staff should place temporary warning signs at access points to the area being disinfected. They should either vacate the area during disinfection or place opaque barriers between the UVGI lamp and room occupants. If these areas are required to be occupied during disinfection and exposures cannot be avoided then personal protective equipment (PPE) should be used.
• Low- and medium-pressure mercury lamps, UVGI LEDs, and far UV-C lamps. Workers should wear plastic or glass face shields to protect the eyes and face, nitrile gloves or work gloves to protect the hands, and full-coverage clothing with tightly woven fabrics to protect all other exposed skin.
• Pulsed xenon arc lamps. Workers should wear welding or cutting goggles to protect the eyes, nitrile gloves or work gloves to protect the hands, and full-coverage clothing with tightly woven fabrics to protect all other exposed skin.

Do eye or skin hazards differ depending upon the lamp type used?

Low- and medium-pressure mercury UVGI lamps emit UV energy that poses a hazard to the cornea and skin. Some UVGI LED devices emit near 270 nm, which poses a hazard to the cornea and skin. “Far UV-C” lamps that emit around 222 nm can pose a hazard to the cornea, and recent studies have been inconsistent regarding whether far UV-C lamps pose a significant skin hazard. Differences may be the result of different glass envelopes allowing some longer-wavelength radiant-energy transmission.

Pulsed xenon arc UVGI lamps emit UV and visible radiant energy that poses a hazard to the retina,cornea, and skin. Some pulsed xenon arc lamps are filtered so that only the UV energy for disinfection is emitted. Xenon arc lamps can also pose additional safety hazards if they are not maintained properly.

These GUV lamps are generally used only in industry, to sterilize food and pharmaceutical containers, for example, but also have been used in GUV devices for hospital room disinfection. Maintenance and service should only be performed by authorized persons.

Will GUV increase my lifetime risk for skin cancer?

UV-C penetrates only the superficial layers of the skin and eye, with the shortest wavelengths hardly penetrating at all to living cells (epidermis), so only a very mild, transitory “sunburn” (erythema) occurs from accidental over-exposure of skin areas. Even though GUV lamps can pose a theoretical delayed hazard, incidental UV exposures in the workplace would not significantly increase one’s lifetime risk for cataract or skin cancer when compared to daily exposure to the UV radiant energy in sunlight. Solar UV is much more penetrating and reaches the germinative (new-cell producing) layers in the skin, with the result that skin cancer risk is significant, and sunburns can be severe. There is a small amount of UV-B (297, 303, 313 nm) from a low-pressure mercury lamp, but this is insignificant unless exposures are experienced at least an order of magnitude or more above the safety limits for 254 nm.

If the room has glass that permits vision into the room and a view of the UV fixtures, does that glass need to be shuttered or covered?

No, not for safety if they are normal 254-nm UV-C lamps. Glass windows block potentially hazardous UV-B and UV-C transmission. Glass windows should be covered if pulsed xenon lamps are in use.

Lamp Technologies

What types of lamp sources are used for GUV?

Lamp technologies include continuously emitting low- and medium-pressure mercury lamps, as well as pulsed xenon arc lamps. Studies have shown that these technologies—continuously emitting or pulsed—are comparably effective for disinfection. Pulsed sources may be more practical if rapid disinfection is required. Light emitting diodes (LEDs) and krypton-chlorine excimer lamps, which emit in narrow bands in the germicidal range (UV-C), are emerging technologies.

What is currently the most widely used lamp source of UV-C for GUV?

The most practical method of generating germicidal radiant energy is by passage of an electric discharge through a rare gas (usually argon) at low pressures (on the order of 130 to 400 pascals, or 1 to 3 torr) containing mercury vapour enclosed in a special glass tube with no fluorescent coating that transmits short-wavelength UV. Hot-cathode germicidal lamps are identical in shape, electrical connection, operating power, and life to standard fluorescent lamps, both linear and compact types. Maintaining the transmission of the lamp over life is more difficult than for standard fluorescent lamps. Cold-cathode germicidal lamps are also available in various sizes, usually for shorter, smaller diameter lamps. Their operating characteristics are similar to those of hot-cathode lamps, but their starting mechanisms are different
Approximately 45% of the input power from such a device is emitted at a mercury-discharge wavelength of 253.7 nm, in the middle of the UV-C band. The second major emission line is at 184.9 nm, but this emission is normally absorbed by the glass, since—if emitted through the glass, as it is with pure quartz—it would create ozone at levels far above the safety limit.

Are there higher-output UV-C lamps?

Medium pressure mercury (Hg) lamps are also used, particularly in water purification. Such lamps resemble high pressure mercury lamps—i.e., are much more compact—and use a clear or doped quartz envelope, depending on application.
Other sources, such as rare gas-halogen (e.g., krypton-chlorine, Kr-Cl) discharge, have been shown to produce significant emission in the far UV-C region (205 to 230 nm). The advantage of sources such as those emitting 207 nm or 222 nm, is that the deactivation rate of some bacteria and viruses appears to be relatively high, and the effect of the emission on human skin and eyes is much reduced compared to the 253.7-nm mercury emission. However, depending on the glass envelope, small but significant levels of longer wavelengths may be of concern. At this time, such sources have been developed in the research laboratory, but their presence in the marketplace is still very limited in comparison to that of mercury lamps, and there is little experience yet with any widespread use.

Are there UV-C emitting LEDs available?

There are reports of companies developing LEDs that emit in the longer-wavelength UV-C region, generally at 265 to 270 nm but it’s likely to be a considerable time before commercially viable systems are brought to market.

GUV Applications

How much UV “light” is required, and how long does the process take, to disinfect a volume of air or a surface?

There are very sophisticated programs to calculate the lamp sizes and in-air dose requirements in terms of energy required for space and radiant fluence (joules per square meter, J/m2) across a cross-section of a UV-C beam, but there is a much simpler evidence-based dose that has been developed over many years for TB control, typically specified as about 17 mW of 254-nm lamp-emission radiant power per cubic meter (m3) of space to disinfect air.
Although this sounds too simplistic to be true, since air in any room is always moving and mixing, one can correctly assume that all air will be treated—the better the air mixing, the sooner this will happen. Studies at the Harvard School of Public Health and elsewhere show log units of reduction equivalent to 24 ACH to achieve 80% reduction of transmission. Of course, 100% reduction is not possible, because of the multiple modes of transmission. To disinfect surfaces, this depends on the type of surface and its cleanliness; recommended exposures vary from 20 to 100 mJ/cm2

How can I measure the light to make sure I’m getting the appropriate amount to get effective disinfection?

There are a number of dedicated meters available; however, a wide range of scale is normally required, e.g., a range from 0.1 to 100 microwatts per square centimeter (µW·cm-2).
Safety readings require the lower range, and efficacy requires a range up to at least 10 mW·cm-2. A common practice is to have two calibrated meters: one in reserve and for reference. The two instruments should be periodically compared. The user should retain the manufacturer’s instructions, including a description of the meter, its safe use, and maintenance and calibration of it. Some healthcare facilities contract with a full, outside maintenance contractor that uses calibrated meters and correctly and safely replaces burned-out lamps. Some users retain a simple, less precise meter for staff to use, but the installer uses a professional meter.

How would it work in the case of a standard room ...How long to treat a 20 x 13ft room 6m x 4m with chairs, coffee tables and magazines? Time to treat?

The original idea on the need for this came from a general request for help to supply this type of unit from a Thoracic and Transplant Consultant Surgeon in the Mater hospital in Dublin. Among her initial comments to us was “They should be in every GP practice and hospital in Ireland”. In regard to the second part of your question, it’s important to point out that this is not a silver bullet solution and does not remove the need for standard deep cleaning as occurs now. What our unit does is that it lifts the level of clean, provides an additional layer of protection for workers and room users, adds security before and after deep clean through the removal of virus and bacteria still left behind after cleaning. The continuous and regular outbreaks of MRSA are proof of the limitations of standard deep cleaning.

This technology cannot see around corners or into shaded areas. It will not disinfect the inner pages of magazines which are not exposed. Depending on room layout, it may need to be moved/ repositioned a number of times to get the best possible result. Stacking units can help increase coverage. Having said that, the approx. time for the size of room you mention with furniture, magazines etc using one unit is approx. 10 minutes.

How specifically does it address COVID-19 contamination, and protect workers and users of medical facilities from infections?

UV-C is well proven in relation to MRSA and while COVID-19 is the ‘new kid on the block’, it is also well proven against close relatives of COVID-19 in recent years. The International Ultraviolet Association (IUVA) believes that UV disinfection technologies can play a role in a multiple barrier approach to reducing the transmission of the virus causing COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2, based on current disinfection data and empirical evidence. UV is a known disinfectant for air, water and surfaces that can help to mitigate the risk of acquiring an infection in contact with the COVID-19 virus when applied correctly. This product will address the need to sterilise rooms.
UV-C light has been used extensively for more than 40 years in disinfecting drinking water, waste water, air, pharmaceutical products, and surfaces against a whole suite of human pathogens (Fluence UV Dose Required review IUVA: https://www.iuvanews.com/stories/pdf/archives/180301_UVSensitivityReview_full.pdf ). All bacteria and viruses tested to date (many hundreds over the years, including other coronaviruses) respond to UV disinfection. Some organisms are more susceptible to UV-C disinfection than others, but all tested so far do respond at the appropriate doses.
COVID-19 infections can be caused by contact with contaminated surfaces and then touching facial areas (less common than person-to-person, but still an issue). Minimizing this risk is key because COVID-19 virus can live on plastic and steel surfaces for many hours. Normal cleaning and disinfection may leave behind some residual contamination, which UVC can treat suggesting that a multiple disinfectant approach is prudent. Accepting as mentioned above that where the UV-C light cannot reach a particular pathogen, that pathogen will not be disinfected. However in general, reducing the total number of pathogens reduces the risk of transmission. The total pathogenic load can be reduced substantially by applying UV to the many surfaces that are readily exposed, as a secondary barrier to cleaning.

Can GUV be used in the home?

Handheld, compact GUV products are sold but are considered a serious safety concern in a general household environment, where children, pets, or careless adults can easily be overexposed. These products are typically less than 10 watts, with open and exposed mercury lamps. They may come with a safety timer; a person places the open lamp on a table or in a convenient location, sets the timer for several minutes to an hour, and is given a 10-second delay to quickly exit the room and close the door.

Does UV degrade paints and other wall materials, or hurt plants?

UV rays in general will degrade paint, yellow plastics, and destroy air filters based on their composition (thus, UV-C irradiation of respirators for reuse should be only be a last resort in a pandemic).
Furthermore, shorter-wavelength UV photons have higher energy potential than longer-wavelength UV photons, and may have an accelerated aging effect on materials and paints. UV-C may damage plants; therefore, hanging plants should not be placed in the disinfection zone in upper-room applications or in whole-room UV-C applications.

How effective are UV robots for surface disinfection?

Hospitals and healthcare facilities have rooms that can be closed off to individuals for a length of time. So-called “UV-C robots” have been used to move around a room to disinfect surfaces with UV-C in all directions. The UV-C radiant energy is normally emitted by long, vertical mercury lamps or pulsed xenon lamps. It is a challenge to estimate dose, but very intense emission can cover much of the room in a relatively short time. Further, by moving autonomously around the unoccupied work space it can expose surfaces that would not be easily reached by fixed GUV lamp installations. If good air movement is present, most air will be disinfected as well, and the dose requirements noted in the answer to the previous question could be applied. Surfaces with thick buildup of residues may pre-absorb the UV-C photons before they reach the active virus or bacterium. As with all GUV systems, they should be considered as an effective adjunct to standard infection control cleaning guidance. These mobile units should be used after terminal cleaning of patient rooms and bathrooms.

What role has it in the equine sector?

This unit can be used to disinfect stables…particularly useful at the high-end/ high value racehorse sector. Room UV Sterilizers reduces the risk of infection and stops the spread of animal sickness. Healthy horses are a result of good hygiene and good disinfection practices. As many animal pathogens are airborne, UVC Sterilization can provide a clean living environment for the horses you care for.

UV Sterilizer

The Muv-X delivers on two key, critical needs
  1. Inactivates virus' and kills bacteria both in the air and left behind on surfaces after a clean and
  2. Provides reassurance to both employees and clients that a business (be that a Hairdressers, a Physio, a General Practitioner, a Dentist, a Solicitor, a GYM operator, Changing Rooms etc etc) is taking every step to protect their health while on the premises.

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3,500.00

UV-C is a proven solution for killing virus and bacteria remaining on surfaces after a deep clean and is an additional line of both attack and defence on top of a regular deep clean. We have tried to factor into our brainstorming a vision of what the ‘new normal’ will be and how we live with that. This is a product that once in the ‘arsenal’ of your office cleaning is a tool you can use as and when you wish, is very simple to use and gives the user a heightened sense of confidence in the deep clean that has taken place.

If you are interested in becoming a distributor or partner, we offer an affiliate program which is open to interested parties, worldwide. 

We’re delighted that our portable UV-C Sterliser (MUV-X) has been featured in a number of publications. We invite you to read what people have to say about our product.

Garage Door Systems

“Additional protection & reassurance for our team & customers to help sterilise our business premises ongoing. This should be of interest to many other businesses & could also help get you up and running more safely and provide additional reassurance for your teams & customers. Many thanks to John O’Connell from CW Applied Technology for supplying Garage Door Systems with 3 of these Room UV Sterilizers.As well as implementing our enhanced internal hygiene & social distancing procedures these Room UV units will provide an added layer of protection and reassurance at Garage Door Systems to regularly sterilise high traffic & all communal areas.Portable to manoeuvre and very effective in the sterilisation of virus & bacteria during these times. Thanks John & all at CW Applied Technology for this innovative bit of technology.If you would like to find out more on how these units work and might help benefit your business get up and running safely again please visit their website below and speak with John.Garage Door Systems are not connected to CW Applied Technology in any way just sharing our experience and trying to help get our business communities up and running safely as we learn.”

Professor Karen Redmond MB BCh BAO MD FRCS CTh Consultant Thoracic & Transplant Surgeon

“I am now using this easy to store, cost-efficient UV-C room steriliser. It takes just under 10 minutes to complement a deep clean supporting our commitment to deliver a safe clinical practice for employees and patients following the COVID19 pandemic. This equipment can support a range of services where cleaning of surfaces is a requirement to maintain health and safety standards, such as GP surgeries, dentist practices, waiting rooms, office spaces, hotel rooms, restaurants etc.”

Michael Vaughan

“We will be using a Mobile UV-C Room Sterilisation unit @vaughanlodge
manufactured by an Irish and Shannon Firm @CWAppliedtech providing a chemical free solution to safe hotel spaces”

Dr. Jonathan Lyne, MB BChir BSc (Hons) MRCP FHRS Consultant Cardiologist and Electrophysiologist, Beacon Hospital, Blackrock Clinic and Hermitage Clinic

“I will definitely be using this technology in our healthcare service to help manage the tsunami of non Covid disease”

Geraldine Gray - Gartian Furey Solicitors

“We are using the UV cleaner in our boardrooms and reception areas. It gives great peace of mind to know these areas are being thoroughly cleaned and offer reassurance to staff and clients. The unit is easy to use and very portable.”
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